Anti-torture presentation at Univ. Methodist Church, June 3, 7:30PM

TUES JUNE 3, 2014, 7:30 p.m., at University Temple United Methodist Church, 1415 NE 43rd Street, Seattle;  The Washington State Religious Campaign Against Torture (WSRCAT) presents “EXPOSING THE TRUTH OF U.S. TORTURE: RESTORING HUMAN DIGNITY AND THE RULE OF LAW” featuring Brig. General David R. Irvine of The Constitution Project.  MC Prof. Rob Crawford.  Panelists The Rev. Rich Lang, Prof. Beth Rivin, and Scott Roehm.  Sponsored by numerous national and local justice organizations.  Free admission.  Info http://www.wsrcat.org

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EXPOSING THE TRUTH OF U.S. TORTURE: RESTORING HUMAN DIGNITY AND THE RULE OF LAW

The Washington State Religious Campaign Against Torture (WSRCAT) invites all to a presentation “Exposing the Truth of U.S. Torture: Restoring Human Dignity and the Rule of Law” featuring Brig. General David R. Irvine of The Constitution Project, and a panel of activists.

TUESDAY JUNE 3, 2014, 7:30 P.M., AT UNIVERSITY TEMPLE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 1415 NE 43RD STREET, SEATTLE, FREE ADMISSION.

Information http://www.wsrcat.org

BRIG. GENERAL DAVID R. IRVINE was an Army Reserve strategic intelligence officer who taught prisoner interrogation and military law for 18 years.  He is a member of the bipartisan Task Force on Detainee Treatment of the nonprofit organization, The Constitution Project, which spent over two years compiling a 600 page report on U.S. held detainees at Guantánamo, Afghanistan, Iraq, and CIA “black sites”.  This report is available for the world to see at http://detaineetaskforce.org/report

The U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee has authored a related report on the Central Intelligence Agency’s detention and interrogation program but this has yet to be released to the public.   Its release is the next crucial step in learning the truth of U.S. torture and this needs to be done immediately with minimal redactions by the White House.

The MC of this important program will be University of Washington PROF. ROB CRAWFORD, a co-founder of WSRCAT.

Panelists include:

THE REV. RICH LANG, Pastor of University Temple United Methodist Church, a consistent voice for global and local justice.

PROFESSOR BETH RIVIN, a pediatrician, Director of University of Washington’s Global Health and Justice Project

SCOTT ROEHM, Senior Counsel, The Constitution Project.

We will also have a guest appearance by REP. JIM MCDERMOTT, 7th Congressional District-WA, an outspoken opponent of torture.

SPONSORS of the event include the national organizations:  The Constitution Project (TCP);  KARAMAH: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights;  National Religious Campaign Against Torture (NRCAT);   Washington State Religious Campaign Against Torture.

CO-SPONSORS include American Civil Liberties Union of Washington State (ACLU-WA);  American Friends Service Committee of Seattle;  Amnesty International USA including Group 4, Seattle;  Board of Church & Society, Pacific NW Conference, United Methodist Church;  Church Council of Greater Seattle (CCGS);  Faith Action Network;  Global Peace and Justice Committee of Fauntleroy Church UCC;  Interfaith Network of Concern for the People of the Middle East (INOC);  Justice & Peace Committee of University Lutheran Church;  Lutheran Peace Fellowship;  The Mission and Peacemaking Committee of Newport Presbyterian Church in Bellevue;  Peace Action Group of Plymouth Church Seattle, UCC;  Philippine-United States Solidarity Organization (PUSO);  St Leo Church, Tacoma;  School of the Americas-Seattle;  Seattle Chapter Fellowship of Reconciliation;  Service and Justice Mission Team of University Christian Church/Disciples of Christ;  Tacoma Chapter #134 of Veterans for Peace;  United Nations Association Greater Seattle Chapter;  University of Washington Center for Human Rights;  Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility;  Western Washington Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Inspire Seattle: Jan 25: No New Jim Crow

          Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 6:30pm * 
Main discussion topic for this evening: 

No New Jim Crow

*To receive InspireSeattle invitations, click here to provide us with an email address.

Following the Civil War and continuing right into the 1960s, African-Americans were racially segregated and systematically discriminated against by a series of local and state laws that collectively became known as Jim Crow laws. These laws would eventually be undermined by the Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. But has the United States truly achieved legal equality for all of its citizens? In 2010 Michelle Alexander published The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness and she argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” Now it is the U.S. criminal justice system that targets black men with higher conviction rates and longer sentences under the “War on Drugs”. These practices decimate communities of color and relegate millions to a permanent second-class status as “ex-cons”.

No New Jim Crow Seattle Campaign is one of several groups in the Seattle/King County area, working to promote positive alternatives to jails, prisons, and punishments. Mary Paterson and other participants from the No New Jim Crow Seattle Campaign will speak at this gathering about transformative/restorative justice as a real alternative that is within our grasp. Their presence in the Seattle area has started the process with education and community organizing programs that will be needed in this next step.

Come join us for what should be a very important and interesting evening!!!

 

About InspireSeattle:
InspireSeattle is a progressive network of Seattle-area people sharing ideas and supporting action. InspireSeattle’s vision is to create connection throughout our community and better community through activism. InspireSeattle’s mission is to provide a fun, supportive gathering for people who care deeply about our community, our country and our planet. We embrace progressive policies that improve our society and protect our environment. We discuss current issues, share ideas and activism efforts while striving to inspire additional action. Subscribe (or unsubscribe) to InspireSeattle by visiting www.inspireseattle.org/contact.html.

When:  Saturdays in 2014 at 6:30PM. Please try to be on time!!!

Where:  You will receive an invitation with the location when you provide us with your email address.

Format 

It s a potluck:  so please help out and bring something to eat and to drink!

6:30 to 7:45:  Social time!  Eat, drink, relax, and catch up with some other local progressives

Formal discussion and guest speakers, 7:45 to 9:30

Other Announcements  got any?

 

Rules of Engagement!

1.  So that everyone has a chance to participate, please keep your comments short

2.  Raise one s hand to ask a question in lieu of shouting out

3.  Respect the points of views of others

4.  No arguing of politics during the formal discussion save that for afterwards! 

 

 

Inspire Seattle Jan 25: No New Jim Crow

Invites YOU to join our  social on   Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 6:30pm * 
Main discussion topic for this evening: 

No New Jim Crow

*To receive InspireSeattle invitations, click here to provide us with an email address.

Following the Civil War and continuing right into the 1960s, African-Americans were racially segregated and systematically discriminated against by a series of local and state laws that collectively became known as Jim Crow laws. These laws would eventually be undermined by the Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. But has the United States truly achieved legal equality for all of its citizens? In 2010 Michelle Alexander published The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness and she argues that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” Now it is the U.S. criminal justice system that targets black men with higher conviction rates and longer sentences under the “War on Drugs”. These practices decimate communities of color and relegate millions to a permanent second-class status as “ex-cons”.

No New Jim Crow Seattle Campaign is one of several groups in the Seattle/King County area, working to promote positive alternatives to jails, prisons, and punishments. Mary Paterson and other participants from the No New Jim Crow Seattle Campaign will speak at this gathering about transformative/restorative justice as a real alternative that is within our grasp. Their presence in the Seattle area has started the process with education and community organizing programs that will be needed in this next step.

Come join us for what should be a very important and interesting evening!!!

 

About InspireSeattle:
InspireSeattle is a progressive network of Seattle-area people sharing ideas and supporting action. InspireSeattle’s vision is to create connection throughout our community and better community through activism. InspireSeattle’s mission is to provide a fun, supportive gathering for people who care deeply about our community, our country and our planet. We embrace progressive policies that improve our society and protect our environment. We discuss current issues, share ideas and activism efforts while striving to inspire additional action. Subscribe (or unsubscribe) to InspireSeattle by visiting www.inspireseattle.org/contact.html.

When:  Saturdays in 2014 at 6:30PM. Please try to be on time!!!

Where:  You will receive an invitation with the location when you provide us with your email address.

Format 

It s a potluck:  so please help out and bring something to eat and to drink!

6:30 to 7:45:  Social time!  Eat, drink, relax, and catch up with some other local progressives

Formal discussion and guest speakers, 7:45 to 9:30

Other Announcements  got any?

 

Rules of Engagement!

1.  So that everyone has a chance to participate, please keep your comments short

2.  Raise one s hand to ask a question in lieu of shouting out

3.  Respect the points of views of others

4.  No arguing of politics during the formal discussion save that for afterwards! 

Review of Donald Guitierrez's Feeling the Unthinkable

This is a recent review on Donald Gutierrez’s new book, Feeling The Unthinkable that I wanted to call to your attention.  I sincerely believe that this book should be read by every American concerned about where our country is headed.

J. Glenn Evans

FEELING THE UNTHINKABLE
By DONALD GUTIERREZ

AMADOR PUBLISHERS, LLC
611 Delamar Ave NW
Albuquerque, NM 87107
(505) 344-6102
zelda@amadorbooks.com
$19.95

Every once in a while a book comes out that all of us should read regardless of age, status or political belief.  The 48 essays and reviews in Feeling the Unthinkable by Donald Gutierrez are a literary feast.  His essays hit in the gut, but his many reviews of other writers’ work introduce us to sources of information of which we need to be aware.  They help you to think and ponder on where we’ve been and where we’re going.  It is an incredibly powerful book from not only a prophet but also an historian and a philosopher that you will not want to miss.

Who would have believed a few years ago that America used torture?  Except for Nazi Germany, it was thought that torture went out in the Middle Ages when the elites used the rack.  Yet now we find that America used waterboarding in the conquest of the Philippines.  In Gutierrez’s review of Alfred W. McCoy’s book, A Question of Torture, it was disclosed that by 1972 the Provincial Interrogations Centers, each directed by CIA personnel, 20,000 Vietcong were murdered in a “pump and dump” practice.  How many were guilty and how many were innocent, nobody knows, except they were fighting a foreign invader.

By the time we got to Iraq and Afghanistan:

A colossal miscarriage of justice behind all this brutal increase of psychological and physical torture emerged when it became clear that, according to military intelligence from allied nations, 70 to 90 percent of Iraqi detainees had been arrested by mistake.  What comes across in this massive injustice is the culpability of a chain of command from the White House lawyers to Rumsfeld to senior military officers like Generals Geoffrey D. Miller and Ricardo Sanchez to ordinary soldiers who followed their orders.  Who takes blame if all this torture came to be proven illegal leads McCoy to the crucial issue of impunity. (63) … McCoy argues, further, that torture is not effective against terrorism, citing the very high number of innocent detainees from whom meager intelligence was coerced at Guantanamo. (64)

 

If we were not the most powerful nation militarily, our leaders would be brought before the world courts because of Nuremberg crimes.  A quote from Gutierrez’s review of Naomi Wolf’s The End of America: Letters of Warning to a Young Patriot is enough to send shivers up your back when you consider what has recently been happening here in the U.S.

“Both Italian and German fascism came to power legally and incrementally in functioning democracies; both used legislation, cultural pressure and baseless imprisonment and torture, progressively to consolidate power….both aggressively used the law to subvert the law” (119)

 

In his essay, “The Great Military-Defense Swindle of America,” Gutierrez brings out the numbers, what we and our kids pay into the Military/Industrial Complex: $8 trillion on military expenditures from 1975 to 2000; $21 million for each M1A2 Abrams Tank (the army has 3,000 of them); $850 million for each Arleigh-Burke-class destroyer (the Navy acquired 17 since 1971 for around $11 billion); more recently 7 more Burke destroyers for around $33 billion.  The destroyers cost around $30,000 a day to operate or $11 million a year plus training costs.  Navy 18EF fighter-bombers, called “Super Hornets” cost $80 million each and the Navy wants 1,000 of them.

In the meantime, the Pentagon and its allies in Congress continue to seek rationalization for the mammoth military budget.  Partly this is needed to conceal the enormous contradictions between legitimate military preparedness and the irony of keeping unused defense factories open by designating perfectly suitable ordnance as outmoded to justify spending further billions for ever more high-tech killing weapons.  Thus, the worst thing that could happen to the Pentagon and America’s war industry is peace.  A more fitting definition of a society led by lunatics and greed would be hard to find, at least among nations describing themselves as democratic. (142-143)

 

Some interesting figures are brought out in Gutierrez’s review of Helen Caldicott, The New Nuclear Danger: George W. Bush’s Military-Industrial Complex.  The quotation from The Defense Monitor put out by retired military officers reflects what could be done with only one third of the military expenditure:

“Globally the annual military expenditure stands at 780 billion dollars.  The total amount required to provide global health care, eliminate starvation and malnutrition, provide clear water and shelter for all, remove land mines, eliminate nuclear weapons, stop deforestation, prevent global warming, ozone depletion and acid rain, retire the paralyzing debt of developing nations, prevent soil erosion, produce safe, clean energy, stop overpopulation and eliminate illiteracy is only one third that amount–$237.5 billion dollars.” (134-135)

 

In “Attending College Must Be Free Again (For the Country’s Own Good),” Donald Gutierrez brings out the fact that in the 1950s he was able to attend college at the University of California in Berkeley with no tuition.  There was a $35 semester charge described as an Incidental Fee for the use of the gym, campus hospital and a first rate library.  Now the semester tuition is $5000 and $16,000 for a nonresident of the state.  He states that Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law cost almost $18,000 per semester, including living expenses and expensive books.  Private schools are a lot more.  Why this must change:

Extreme financial stress on responsible college students is not only unjust, it is dangerous to the country’s future.  Higher education should be free to all young people who show an aptitude for and aspire to advanced learning and professional or technical training.  Society needs doctors, nurses, dentists, teachers, scholars, engineers, lawyers, economists, novelists, poets, and social, political and cultural critics and other experts—now and in the future.  If, however, those high college debt hurdles remain, the consequences are obvious and pernicious: For the most part, only youths from wealthy or comfortable families will be able to afford college, especially quality colleges.  The result will be not only a class-based educational structure—Yale vs. Flatsburg City College—but the hardening of a class-structured society. (177)

 

We not only have the Military/Industrial Complex, as President Eisenhower warned against, but now the Prison/Industrial Complex that allows corporations to make fortunes on other people’s misery.  Punishment for crime and rehabilitation for return to society are functions of the state and must not be delegated to private enterprise.  It behooves all citizens to be aware of what goes on in prisons.  With our present system of justice, any of us, innocent or guilty, could end up in prison.  Protest an injustice and be labeled a terrorist, you become a victim of indefinite detention, especially if you are nonwhite.  Gutierrez reflects on “The New Electrical Meanspiritedness in America”:

An alarming trend in American prisons is the use of electrical devices on prisoners.  This usage constitutes a serious erosion of what some regard as essential ethical restraint on prison authorities from imposing cruelty on convicts.  In a long 1997 article in the New York Review of Books entitled “Cruel and Unusual Punishment,” William F. Schulz, executive director of Amnesty International, USA, discussed the increasing use of such devices as stun belts, stun guns, shock batons and electric shields by law enforcement officials to control prisoners. … According to Schulz:

 “Stun belts deliver 50,000 volt shocks to the left kidney which fan out from there through blood channels and nerve pathways.  Shocks can be administered by guards form a distance of up to 300 feet simply by the push of a button.  An 8-second application of shock inevitably knocks a person to the ground and may induce urination, defecation or unconsciousness.” (195)

 

From his own personal encounters with racism, to the hell of the Nazi death camps, to the reality of war, the global exploitation of the earth’s resources, and worldwide abuses of human rights, Gutierrez reminds us how the past haunts the present.

Gutierrez concludes the collection with a subject dear to me as a poet and writer: “The Power of the Pen.”  From a review of Howard Zinn’s The Zinn Reader, he moves on to the teaching of the humanities in college, fiction, war poems, the concept of “Us” versus “Them”, our mother earth as a living vital force, and finally poetry as both a prophetic and an humanitarian response to the dark side of human nature.  He takes us full circle with the Occupy Movement.

Dozens of books on American imperialist foreign policy and corporate greed have been written.  Some of them may seem general and abstract, and in Gutierrez’s collection of essays in Feeling the Unthinkable, he reviews a number of those books.  Many Americans prefer not to think about the abuses of power by its government, and who can blame them, but reading Gutierrez, we feel our humanity rise, to extend it in empathy toward the victims of American foreign policy, and to know that it is our common humanity that binds us together.  This is the gift of Gutierrez’s collection of essays in Feeling the Unthinkable.

 

Donald Gutierrez was a member of the University of Notre Dame English Department faculty from 1968 to 1975, then joined the English Department at Western New Mexico University in Silver City. He retired from WNMU in 1994 and moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico with his wife Marlene Zander Gutierrez. He received a “New Mexico Eminent Scholar Award” in 1989. Gutierrez has published six books of literary criticism, two of which focus on D. H. Lawrence and one on Kenneth Rexroth. He has published over fifty essays and reviews, most of which concern social justice and American state terrorism abroad.

 

Reviewed by J. Glenn Evans, poet, novelist, activist, and founding director of PoetsWest

1100 University St. #17A

Seattle WA 98101

JGE2@poetswest.com

www.poetswest.com

206.682.1268

Restorative Justice Issue Call, Saturday

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For those who have RSVP’d to attend this event, don’t forget the call is this Saturday!

If you haven’t RSVP’d yet, please read on…

Don,

California’s justice system appears blind–blind to the inhumanity of its prison system. Inmates in California are still protesting torturous solitary confinement and other inhumane conditions in a hunger strike, which has been ongoing since last week.

The US has more inmates in prisons and jails than any other country. Prisons have become big business through privatization, and they have real economic and social consequences.

On Saturday July 27, Justice Party Vice Presidential candidate Luis Rodriguez will speak about restorative justice. We invite you to join us!

JP-LJRodriguez-head.pngRESTORATIVE JUSTICE ISSUE CALL
Saturday, July 27
12PM ET, 11AM CT, 10AM MT, 9AM PT
RSVP-125x38.jpg

Luis will be joined by his son Ramiro in a discussion of restorative justice, why it is important to the individuals involved and our communities, and how to get involved. In addition, we’ll learn what others are doing to prevent incarceration, especially among young men living in urban communities of color.

Please RSVP and mark your calendar for July 27. We’ll send you the call-in information in an email acknowledgement after you register.

We encourage you to invite friends and family members to join us for this timely and important discussion.

Yours for Justice,

The Justice Party National Steering Committee

Ted Koppel and Tonya Britton on Privatization

Ted Koppel on Privatization

Tonya Britton -· “…I’m all for business. I’ve spent the past 15 years working tirelessly on behalf of business – big business, small business. corporations. mom & pops. retail. restaurants. the service industry. manufacturing. healthcare. I just think there are some things in this world that do not need to be run by companies and churches. There are some things that just need to be owned and operated – by the people, for the people, on behalf of the people.

“…Privatizing services creates an inherent conflict of interest and a disproportionate impact on members within the population. In short, privatization skews the moral compass and no just society can exist when the good of the people is obscured and the demands of the constitution are subordinated by private interest.”

Interactive Podcast on Youth Justice: Tuesday, June 4

Feature Backbone Images
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Youth Leaders Confronting the Prison Industrial Complex

Interactive Podcast on Youth Justice
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Youth Justice Reinvestment, Part II: Youth-led Solutions and Successes to Juvenile Injustice
Baltimore Algebra Project
On Tuesday, June 4th at 5:30 Pacific/8:30 Eastern, we invite you to join us for the second of our Conversations on youth justice reinvestment. Zachary Norris and Grace Bauer, co-directors of Justice for Families coalition, are co-producing this series. Justice for Families is a national alliance of local organizations working to end the youth incarceration epidemic in the United States.RSVP for Call-in Information
Converse with and join the Q & A with these amazing change-makers at the forefront of the fight for Youth Justice, working to end the school-to-prison pipeline and the for-profit prison system that is shackling the future of our families and our communities’.Screen Shot 2013-05-31 at 12.20.54 AMWe will feature Youth Justice Coalition (YJC) organizers Kim McGill, Kruti Parekh, and youth leaders. YJC is successfully building a youth, family and prisoner-led movement to challenge race, gender and class inequity in L.A.’s and California’s juvenile injustice system. Direct actions, advocacy, political education, transformative justice and activist multi-media arts are all used by YJC to demand immediate and systemic change.Additionally, Nicole Cheatom will join us. Nicole is a leader with the Baltimore Algebra Project (BAP). BAP is a youth-run non-profit that increases math literacy and empowers Baltimore’s students through fair-wage math teaching jobs, education-as-a-right advocacy, and leadership development. In the last nine years, BAP has funded $2 million in wages to employ youth. Recently, BAP was part of an astounding coalition that successfully prevented the construction of a new $99.7 million youth detention building .
YCJ and mobile mural lab
We also welcome King Downing, attorney, founder of the Human Rights-Racial Justice Project, member of the Campaign to End the New Jim Crow, and former Program Analyst for the Healing Justice Program of the American Friends Service Committee.

Our guests and their groups are united in their desire to move resources (money, time, human energy) away from locking people up and toward prevention, building healthy communities, and supporting youth and families!
PrisonCrossingSign
For our June 4th Conversation, each guest will bring their expertise on, and holistic solutions to, the devastating impact of our nation’s juvenile injustice policies. We will hear success stories and future plans: supplemental education structures, affordable transportation and employment, closure of youth detention facilities, prevention of new youth prisons, restorative justice practices, community-based prevention and support systems, and more!

Our progressive cabinet podcast series, Conversations with the Cabinet is in its eighth year, and our June 4th interview is our 87th. This project has evolved to now focus on sharing practical ideas and engage in coalition building. Our follow-up resource pages are an online creative echo chamber for organizer- and stakeholder-led solutions to difficult issues. Our technology-based Conversation series functions alongside Backbone Campaign trainings and workshops. We hope both structures are of use.

Call instructions:
StepsBooksNotBarsProjectionRegister for the call by clicking the RSVP or join the conversation links. You will receive an email with the call-in number and PIN. You can ask questions through our public chat at BackboneCampaign.org/chat, this will let the moderator know to call on you. No password is required to use the chat, just type your name into the username section.

We invite call participants to ask questions of the quests and have a dialogue. To facilitate turning the conversation into great resource page in the future we’ll keep other mics muted to cut down on the background noise. If you are not at your computer you can still indicate you have a question. PLEASE let us know that you have a question or comment by pressing “1” on your telephone keypad. We’ll then ask you what your question is and let Diane our moderator know to call on you.

Join the growing movement for youth justice reinvestment! Join our Conversation!

Diane Wittner
Bill Moyer
Conversations with the Cabinet
Backbone Campaign

Stop Shackling Our Youth! Interactive Podcast on Youth Justice

Backbone Campaign

 

Youth Justice Reinvestment Part I: Family Solutions and Success Stories for Youth in the Juvenile System

On Tuesday, May 28th at 5:30pm Pacific/8:30pm EST, we invite you to join us for the first of two Conversations on youth justice reinvestment. We are honored to welcome Zachary Norris, Co-Director of Justice for Families coalition, as our co-producer for this series.

RSVP for Call-in Information
Converse with and join the Q & A with these amazing change-makers at the forefront of the fight for Justice for Youth, working to end the school-to-prison pipeline and the for-profit prison system that is shackling the future of our families and our communities’.

 
Freedom is the key
“Freedom is the Key” Poster created in 2012 by a 17-year-old student (who had experienced incarceration) in a high school art class at a Residential Treatment Center.”
Justice For Families is a national alliance of local organizations working to end the youth incarceration epidemic in the U.S. and to transform families from prison system victims to leader in a movement for fairness and opportunity for all youth.
In September, Justice For Families released a historic report Families Unlocking Futures which was written by and about families with personal experience in the system. The report explains how juvenile justice systems prepare youth, families and communities for failure. It also offers solutions for families and for the transformation of youth justice to help youth succeed and maintain community safety.
Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow said this about the report:
This extraordinary report is a must-read for people of conscience, people who know that young people who make mistakes and struggle in school deserve our care, compassion and concern — not humiliation, prison cells, relentless shame, and all their family supports stripped from them. This comprehensive study examines our youth prison system from the perspective of those who are most impacted — young people and their families. Finally, it demonstrates the power of their collective voice. This report shares their insightful observations as well as jaw-dropping data, revealing a system that is not just broken, but one that must be entirely transformed.
For our May 28th Conversation, we welcome a line-up of extraordinary guests, all of whom either contributed to the report or are implementing solutions in their communities.
Grace Bauer, Co-Director of Justice For Families will speak from direct experience as a parent in the system, along with Liane Rozzell, Executive Director of Families and Allies of Virginia’s Youth. We will also be joined by Gina Womack, Executive Director of Families and Friends of Louisiana’s Incarcerated Children and 2012 Recipient of the Louisianian of the Year Award for Civic Activism. Raj Jayadev, former Soros Justice Fellow, organizer with Silicon Valley De-Bug and coordinator of the Albert Corrubias Justice Project will talk about his group’s practical trainings for families, and their step-by-step online instruction manual Court Warriors: A Guide for Families, Communities and Organizations.
Our Progressive Cabinet podcast, Conversations with the Cabinet, is in its eighth year, and this will be our 86th interview. This project now focuses on facilitating and sharing practical strategies that most can implement throughout the U.S.. We also seek to amplify organizers’ and stakeholders’ innovative solutions to seemingly intractable issues. Thus, our Conversations augment Backbone Campaign creative tactics trainings and workshops. We hope both forms – virtual and in situ – are of use.

On May 28th at 5:30pm Pacific/8:30pm EST, courageous stakeholders and organizers from California and Louisiana, to Virginia and Maryland, will exchange stories of family and youth transformation and youth justice reinvestment.
Lift up all our families and children – now!
Diane Wittner
Bill Moyer
Conversations with the Cabinet
Backbone Campaign

PS – Our second Youth Justice Reinvestment Conversation is on on June 4th, and will feature Youth Justice Coalition youth leaders and organizers, along with youth leaders fromBaltimore Algebra Project. Save the date!


Please contribute to support our ample action support!
Send A Check To:
Backbone Campaign
P.O. Box 278 Vashon, WA 98070
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